Tag archive for "Amidar"

Justice in Israel

Public housing tenant wins courtroom victory against Amidar, is not evicted

No Comments 30 November 2015


We are proud to report Rabbis for Human Rights has had an important, precedent setting court victory with potentially deep implications for public housing in Israel! Amidar, one of the major public housing firms in the country, has been prevented from evicting a tenant due to unreliable, contradictory documentation from home inspections.
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Justice in Israel

The right to a stable home: Important policy shifts announced at Public Housing Day!

No Comments 28 October 2015


The Housing Ministry: There will not be an increase of rental rates and the tenants of public housing will be able to purchase new apartments at the price of old apartments in the framework of urban renewal.

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Justice in Israel

Oct 27 is Public Housing Day at the Knesset!

No Comments 12 October 2015

October 27 is Public Housing Day at the Knesset!

Public Housing Day is an initiative of the Public Housing Forum and the heads of the Knesset’s housing caucus- Dov Hanin, Orly Levy Abekasis, Ilan Gilon, Omer Bar-Lev, Itzik Shmuli, Stav Shafir and Eli Cohen. Continue Reading

Justice in Israel

Amidar: The public housing company that’s not building public housing

No Comments 04 May 2015

Public housing corporation Amidar has big plans to build – the problem is they won’t be building public housing! Continue Reading

Justice in Israel, Legal Work

His day in court: Legal victory marks step forward in the fight to save public housing

No Comments 06 October 2014

RHR Advocate Becky Cohen-Keshet specializes in public housing in Israel. On Thursday October 2nd, the day before the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur, where Jews atone for their sins and believe their fates for the coming year to be sealed, she achieved a victory for public housing at the High Court. It is our hope that this case will act as a stepping stone in our struggle to save public housing in Israel, so that all those in need of a stable, safe home will have one.   Continue Reading

General, Justice in Israel, Legal Work, Occupied Territories, Parasha / E-Letter

Yom Kippur Thoughts 5775: Distinguishing between Masui and Ratsui

No Comments 03 October 2014

Dear Friends and Supporters,

Click here for RHR’s annual Yom Kippur vidui. The annual Assif Rukhani (Spiritual Harvest – The list of some of what is good and positive about Israel and Israelis, as well as some of RHR’s accomplishments in this past year) will be posted on our website (www.rhr.org.il/eng) on Sunday, along with beautiful ushpizin (Sukkah guests) posters featuring original artwork depicting some of those who we wish to welcome into our sukkah and into our hearts. Continue Reading

Education, General, Justice in Israel

RHR’s work in public housing in Beit She’an once again wins “Outstanding Project Award”

No Comments 03 May 2014

We are pleased and proud to announce that once again this year the practicum work of our project in public housing at Beit She’an has been recognized as outstanding by the academic staff of the Yezreel Valley College!  Continue Reading

Education, General, Justice in Israel

Giving answers to public housing residents: An RHR intern on her public housing field work

No Comments 20 April 2014

Reut Srugo interviews Natalie Levy on behalf of the Practicum newsletter of the Department of Human Services at Yezreel Valley College (In Hebrew). Natalie is participating in a practical training course for the public housing residents’ empowerment groups as a part of a project with Rabbis for Human Rights. Two years ago, the practicum project earned first prize at a Yezreel Valley College contest (link in Hebrew). In addition to greatly influencing the field itself, the project has also had a powerful impact on the students themselves.


Natalie, tell us about Rabbis for Human Rights.
The organization works to promote weak populations in various fields and exerts pressure to help defend the rights of minorities in Israel. We are working in the field of public housing to help people claim all of their social rights and deal with the bureaucracy at the Ministry of Housing and Amidar, the state-owned housing company. As part of our work, we visit with people in housing units and we conduct empowerment meetings, which is a really central component of our activity.

What are empowerment meetings and why do they matter?
In a tough neighborhood where most of the housing issues are concentrated, there’s a meeting with the residents of the apartment buildings once a week. The goal of these meetings is that by the end of a three month period, every building will have a person who is in charge of helping out with the residents’ referrals, who will direct the group and serve as their leader in the future. Rabbi Kobi Weiss, our facilitator, gives them tools for how to operate, what they need to do for themselves, instead of expecting things to be handed to them. As part of the meetings, rabbis come and run study sessions. Even the mayor came to one of the meetings. We seek to expand our project to new neighborhoods and to provide a solution to all public housing residents.

Do you feel like you got something out of participating in the practicum this year?
The internship gave me a network of contacts and I learned how to speak in front of an audience and also how to better talk to people. I gained exposure to Israel’s public housing problems and to the fact that there really are people in desperate situations. I learned how to approach people with empathy, to not attack, and in other situations to be assertive, how to listen and what to do to help them. The theoretical knowledge that I learned in class helped, obviously. One other important thing that I learned this year is not to judge people based on stereotypes.

WATCH: Our project to empower public housing residents in Beit She’an got into the top 5 at the Yezreel Valley College competition! The presentation was made by the students Tair Nassi and Natalie Levy (in Hebrew):

Do you feel that your practicum with Rabbis for Human Rights influenced your identity as a woman working in human services? If so, how did that look in practice?
Yes. On a personal level, it changed how I see the field that I want to work in. As in, not necessarily in recruiting and placement, but the social aspect – I guess I now prefer to do active work in the field rather than office work. At this organization there’s only a little bit of administrative work like entering people’s telephone information and there’s a lot more activity out in the field. This semester showed other elements that you don’t see in every organization. Last year I was in a more administrative role. This year I discovered that there is a lot of room to be creative. I’m a person interested in building creative solutions, and here I learned that it’s possible to integrate that approach into your practicum, to go beyond just doing office work. It’s important to me to bring my own voice into my work.

Did you ever get the feeling that you were doing something not related to your practicum?
There were a number of situations like that – it makes sense that more situations like these will take place, like in every organization. When that happens I say to myself, if this is what my manager wants me to do then it’s fine, I don’t need to worry that they are taking advantage or wonder whether it’s ok. Instead I should go with it, do what they expect, but make sure I get explanations for what I’m doing. Also, my facilitator was always trying to make me feel good, and was considerate, calming and supportive.

What would you like to accomplish by the end of the year?
I want to win the department’s outstanding project award this year. In my opinion, every student in our program wants to earn that honor. When they consider you for the outstanding project award, it means that your work is visible, that they see that you worked for the organization. That kind of recognition would bring me satisfaction both on the inside and on an external level.

In your opinion, when you enter the job market, will you have an advantage over students who didn’t do a practicum?
Of course. Last year I was in a recruitment and placement office and I got to know people who didn’t do a practicum and lacked experience. You learn a lot from your facilitator in the field alongside guidance from lecturers in class.

From the the newsletter of the practicum for the course in social services at Yezreel Valley College (page 6 in Hebrew) | More about the empowerment groups in Beit She’an (also in Hebrew)

General, Justice in Israel, Press Releases

Press Release: Instead of Succot, building a house for one who has none. Published on the blog of Rabbis for Human Rights

No Comments 02 October 2012

Israeli police evicted on a single mother, Rachel, and her daughter, from their apartment, owned by the public housing company of “Amidar”, in the city of Yavne, January 23, 2012. The company forced the family out of the apartment and sealed the house, although they were living there since 1967, without offering them any other housing solution. Keren Manor/Activestills

Rachel Levi-Davida, a homeless woman from Yavne, who was evicted from the Amidar flat where she had grown up, intends – with the help of activists -  to build a wooden house instead of a Succa during Succot, and to make it her permanent home. 8 months after her eviction, she has no other way out.

Rachel Levi-Davida calls on other homeless men and women to follow her example and set up such social “outposts.” She hopes to slowly create a trend whereby vulnerable citizens take control of their fate and build themselves housing without government help: building a home in place of the one seized by the state. Continue Reading

General, Justice in Israel

Being poor in Israel

No Comments 31 July 2012

Protest for public housing, Jerusalem, Israel, 26.7.2012  Protesters shout slogans in front of the house of Housing Minister Ariel Atias in Jerusalem, during a protest for public housing on July 26, 2012.  Photo by: JC/Activestills.org

Rabbi Idit Lev, looking back in a moment of reflection, following the death of Moshe Silman Continue Reading

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